What You Need to Know About WannaCry Ransomware

What You Need to Know About WannaCry Ransomware

ransomware protectionThe WannaCry Ransomware attack has been touted as the biggest ransomware attack in history. The attack has engulfed businesses around the world, bringing many large enterprises and hospitals to a standstill. The ransomware affects Microsoft Systems, particularly older, unpatched operating systems such as XP. Microsoft released a patch for versions of Windows it no longer supports — because many businesses and organizations use legacy technology as critical infrastructure.

If you are attacked:

  • Experts are advising infected users not to pay the ransom, because it is unlikely they will get their files back. You will most likely have to rely on data backups to recover encrypted data.
  • Contact law enforcement. We strongly encourage you to contact a local FBI field office upon discovery to report an intrusion and request assistance. Maintain and provide relevant logs.
  • Implement your security incident response and business continuity plan. Ideally, organizations should ensure they have appropriate backups so their response is simply to restore the data from a known clean backup.
  • Work with your trusted IT and cybersecurity partner to ensure you fully recover from the attack and are protected against future attacks.

Recommended Steps for Prevention from Homeland Security:

  • Apply the Microsoft patch for the MS17-010 SMB vulnerability dated March 14, 2017.
  • Enable strong spam filters to prevent phishing e-mails from reaching the end users and authenticate in-bound e-mail using technologies like Sender Policy Framework (SPF), Domain Message Authentication Reporting and Conformance (DMARC), and DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) to prevent e-mail spoofing.
  • Ensure anti-virus and anti-malware solutions are set to automatically conduct regular scans.
  • Manage the use of privileged accounts. Implement the principle of least privilege. No users should be assigned administrative access unless absolutely needed.
  • Configure access controls including file, directory, and network share permissions with least privilege in mind. If a user only needs to read specific files, they should not have write access to those files, directories, or shares.
  • Disable macro scripts from Microsoft Office files transmitted via e-mail. Consider using Office Viewer software to open Microsoft Office files transmitted via e-mail instead of full Office suite applications.
  • Develop, institute and practice employee education programs for identifying scams, malicious links, and attempted social engineering.
  • Have regular penetration tests run against the network. No less than once a year. Ideally, as often as possible/practical.
  • Test your backups to ensure they work correctly upon use.
Contact ACE IT Solutions if you need assistance protecting against or recovering from a ransomware attack. Our technology and cybersecurity experts can be sure all the proper steps are taken to protect your systems against ransomware.